APEX-5 Panel
Fasting Required: Yes - 10 to 12 hours

Specimen: Blood

Results: 5-7 Business days
Note: Result turnaround times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. Our reference lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

Tests Included:

Comprehensive Wellness Profile (CWP)is the #1 ordered test - year after year! Over 50 individual laboratory tests screen for cardiovascular risk, major organ function, anemia, diabetes, infection, blood disease and other indications of illness. This panel is routinely ordered as a part of an annual exam. It includes:
Lipids: This is a group of simple blood tests that reveal important information about the types, amount and distribution of the various types of fats (lipids) in the bloodstream. Includes Total Cholesterol, HDL (good) Cholesterol, LDL (bad) Cholesterol, Risk Ratio (good to total), and Triglycerides.

Complete Blood Count(CBC's): It is a blood test that checks hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Used as a broad screening test to check for such disorders as anemia, infection, and many other diseases. Changing levels of red or white blood cells can indicate disease or infection and are very helpful in a health screening.

Fluids and Electrolytes: Electrolytes are minerals in your body that have an electric charge. They are in your blood, urine and body fluids. Maintaining the right balance of electrolytes helps your body's blood chemistry, muscle action and other processes. Sodium, potassium, chlorine, and carbon dioxide are all electrolytes. You get them from the foods you eat and the fluids you drink.
Levels of electrolytes in your body can become too low or too high. That can happen when the amount of water in your body changes, causing dehydration or overhydration. Causes include some medicines, vomiting, diarrhea, sweating or kidney problems. Problems most often occur with levels of sodium, potassium or calcium. It includes: Chloride, Potassium, Sodium and Carbon Dioxide.

TSH: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced in the pituitary gland and stimulates the production of thyroid hormones. The TSH helps identify an underactive or overactive thyroid state.

Liver: The liver panel includes several blood tests measuring specific proteins and liver enzymes in the blood. This combination of blood tests is designed to give you a complete picture of the state of your liver and help detect liver disease and measure potential liver damage. Some of the blood tests are associated with the integrity of the liver cells (i.e. ALT), some with liver function (i.e. albumin) and some with disease linked to the biliary system (i.e. alkaline phosphatase). Includes: Albumin, Alkaline Phosphatase, Alanine Transaminase (ALT or SGPT), Aspartate Transaminase (AST or SGOT), Total Bilirubin, Total Protein, LDH, Total Globulin, Albumin/Globulin Ration and GGT.

Kidney: This basic metabolic panel is a group of blood tests that provides information about your body's metabolism. This test is done to evaluate kidney function, blood acid/base balance, blood sugar levels. It includes Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN), Creatinine, BUN/Creatinine Ratio, eGFR, and Uric Acid.

Glucose Changes in blood glucose are a good indicator of metabolic function and can help detect diseases like diabetes mellitus. Since diabetes is the most common cause of kidney disease in adults, it is important to monitor for this disorder when evaluating kidney function.

Mineral and Bone: In addition to its mechanical functions, the bone is a reservoir for minerals (a "metabolic" function). The bone stores 99% of the body's calcium and 85% of the phosphorus. It is very important to keep the blood level of calcium within a narrow range. If blood calcium gets too high or too low, the muscles and nerves will not function. In times of need, for example, during pregnancy, calcium can be removed from the bones. It includes: Total Iron, Calcium, and Phosphorus.

Magnesium:This mineral is particularly important to nerves and muscles. Low magnesium is found in malnutrition, alcoholism, diabetes, hyperparathyroidism, and more. High magnesium is seen in kidney failure

Iron W/TIBC:Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)measures the amount of transferrin, a blood protein that transports iron from the gut to the cells that use it. Your body makes transferrin in relationship to your need for iron; when iron stores are low, transferrin levels increase, while transferrin is low when there is too much iron. Usually about one third of the transferrin is being used to transport iron. Because of this, your blood serum has considerable extra iron-binding capacity, which is the Unsaturated Iron Biding Capacity (UIBC). The TIBC equals UIBC plus the serum iron measurement. Some laboratories measure UIBC, some measure TIBC, and some measure transferrin.

Ferritin:Composed of iron and protein, Ferritin is a storehouse for iron in the body. Measurement provides an accurate picture of how much iron you have available in reserve. It is used to evaluate anemia and for diagnosing iron deficiency. Low Ferritin is a sign of iron deficiency. Ferritin is high with inflammation, infection, liver disease, iron overload, certain amends and certain cancers (leukemia and lymphoma

T3-Total:One Increased T3 often occurs in hyperthyroidism, but in approximately 5% of cases only T3 is elevated, “T3 toxicosis.” Do not confuse T3 with T3 uptake; these are two different tests. The latter is done very commonly as part of the usual thyroid profile. Less than 1% of T3 is unbound.

T3 Free: Tri-iodothyronine (T3):This test is used to evaluate thyroid function. It is primarily used to diagnose hyperthyroidism. It is also used to assess abnormal binding protein disorders and to monitor thyroid replacement and suppressive therapy .

T4 Free: Thyroxine T4 (Free): This test is used to evaluate thyroid function in individuals who may have protein abnormalities that could affect total T4 levels. It is used to evaluate thyroid function and monitor replacement and suppressive therapy

TPO: The TPO gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called thyroid peroxidase. This enzyme plays a central role in the function of the thyroid gland. Thyroid peroxidase assists the chemical reaction that adds iodine to a protein called thyroglobulin, a critical step in generating thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones play an important role in regulating growth, brain development, and the rate of chemical reactions in the body (metabolism).

TAA: This test helps to detect possible thyroid problems. Thyroglobulin is a protein that is normally confined to the thyroid gland. It is the source of the thyroxine and triiodothyronine hormones in the body. The presence of autoantibodies to thyroglobulin can lead to the destruction of the thyroid gland. Such antibodies are more likely to appear after trauma to, or inflammation of, the thyroid gland.

HgbA1C: This non-fasting test indicates how well you have controlled your diabetes over the last few months. Even though you may have some very high or very low blood glucose values, Hemoglobin A1C will give you a picture of the average amount of glucose in your blood over that time period. The result can help you and your doctor know if the measures you are taking to control your diabetes are successful. Hemoglobin A1C is not a substitute for daily, routine blood glucose diabetes testing.

C-Reactive protein,hs: a substance in the blood that indicates the presence of inflammation and could warn of a heart attack in advance. Elevated amounts of the protein in men may triple their risk for heart attack and double their risk for stroke, whereas elevated amounts in women can increase their heart attack risk up to seven times. Cardio (also specific or high sensitivity) C-Reactive Protein is a marker of inflammation to the blood vessels and a strong predictor of risk for future myocardial infarctions. Cardiovascular tests ordered vary based on patient symptoms as well as family history.

Homocysteine: commonly used as a screen for people at high risk for heart attack or stroke. It may be useful in patients who have a family history of coronary artery disease but no other known risk factors.

Fibrinogen:also referred to as factor I, is a 340 kilodalton glycoprotein that is produced by the liver. Fibrinogen has a plasma half-life of about 4 days. Proteolytic conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin occurs through both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways.6 Fibrinogen deficiency should be considered when a patient with bleeding history has both extended protime (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT).

Vitamin D, 25 Hydroxy:This highly automated test measures both D2 and D3 together and reports a total 25-hydroxy.

Vitamin D is also known as the "sunshine vitamin" because the body manufactures the vitamin after being exposed to sunshine. Ten to 15 minutes of sunshine 3 times weekly is enough to produce the body's requirement of vitamin D. Needed for strong bones and teeth, Vitamin D helps your body absorb the amount of calcium it needs. It also has other roles in the body, including modulation of cell growth, neuromuscular and immune function, and reduction of inflammation. There are associations between low Vitamin D levels and peripheral vascular disease, certain cancers, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile diabetes, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's disease.

Foods that are rich in Vitamin D:
•milk fortified with vitamin D
•fish
•egg yolks
•liver
•fortified cereal