Monthly Specials

Test of the Month

DirectLabs® offers low-cost, high-quality laboratory tests at a fraction of the cost. Due to volume based pricing, we are able to offer these savings to you at up to 80 percent off published retail prices. Each month, we offer additional savings on selected tests. Don't miss out! Order today before the sale on this test comes to an end!


ABO Group & Rh (D) Typing

Only $29

 
 
DLS Regular Price: $44

Fasting Required:No

Specimen: Blood

Results: 1-2 Business Days

Description: Used to determine ABO blood group and Rh type.

This test is the determination of ABO blood group and Rh type. The possible blood types are: O positive, O negative, A positive, A negative, B positive, B negative, AB positive and AB negative. Type O negative is known as the universal donor and AB positive is known as the universal recipient. Rh typing (positive or negative) is generally used to determine Rh immune globulin (present in red blood cells) candidacy for prenatal and postpartum patients.


Men's Health Check

Only $119

 

DLS Regular Price:
$188

Fasting Required: Yes, 10-12 Hours

Specimen: Blood

Results: 3-5 Business Days

Includes: Comprehensive Wellness Profile, PSA, Urinalysis, and CRP-hs

Includes: Comprehensive Wellness Profile (CWP), Urinalysis, Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) and C-Reactive Protein, hs (CRP, hs)

Comprehensive Wellness Profile (CWP) is the #1 ordered test - year after year! Over 50 individual laboratory tests screen for cardiovascular risk, major organ function, anemia, diabetes, infection, blood disease and other indications of illness. This panel is routinely ordered as a part of an annual exam. It includes: 
Lipids: This is a group of simple blood tests that reveal important information about the types, amount and distribution of the various types of fats (lipids) in the bloodstream. Includes Total Cholesterol, HDL (good) Cholesterol, LDL (bad) Cholesterol, Risk Ratio (good to total), and Triglycerides.
Complete Blood Count(CBC's): It is a blood test that checks hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Used as a broad screening test to check for such disorders as anemia, infection, and many other diseases. Changing levels of red or white blood cells can indicate disease or infection and are very helpful in a health screening.
Fluids and Electrolytes: Electrolytes are minerals in your body that have an electric charge. They are in your blood, urine and body fluids. Maintaining the right balance of electrolytes helps your body's blood chemistry, muscle action and other processes. Sodium, potassium, chlorine, and carbon dioxide are all electrolytes. You get them from the foods you eat and the fluids you drink. Levels of electrolytes in your body can become too low or too high. That can happen when the amount of water in your body changes, causing dehydration or overhydration. Causes include some medicines, vomiting, diarrhea, sweating or kidney problems. Problems most often occur with levels of sodium, potassium or calcium. It includes: Chloride, Potassium, Sodium and Carbon Dioxide.
TSH: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced in the pituitary gland and stimulates the production of thyroid hormones. The TSH helps identify an underactive or overactive thyroid state.
Liver: The liver panel includes several blood tests measuring specific proteins and liver enzymes in the blood. This combination of blood tests is designed to give you a complete picture of the state of your liver and help detect liver disease and measure potential liver damage. Some of the blood tests are associated with the integrity of the liver cells (i.e. ALT), some with liver function (i.e. albumin) and some with disease linked to the biliary system (i.e. alkaline phosphatase). Includes: Albumin, Alkaline Phosphatase, Alanine Transaminase (ALT or SGPT), Aspartate Transaminase (AST or SGOT), Total Bilirubin, Total Protein, LDH, Total Globulin, Albumin/Globulin Ration and GGT.
Kidney: This basic metabolic panel is a group of blood tests that provides information about your body’s metabolism. This test is done to evaluate kidney function, blood acid/base balance, blood sugar levels. It includes Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN), Creatinine, BUN/Creatinine Ratio, eGFR, and Uric Acid.
Glucose Changes in blood glucose are a good indicator of metabolic function and can help detect diseases like diabetes mellitus. Since diabetes is the most common cause of kidney disease in adults, it is important to monitor for this disorder when evaluating kidney function.
Mineral and Bone: In addition to its mechanical functions, the bone is a reservoir for minerals (a "metabolic" function). The bone stores 99% of the body's calcium and 85% of the phosphorus. It is very important to keep the blood level of calcium within a narrow range. If blood calcium gets too high or too low, the muscles and nerves will not function. In times of need, for example, during pregnancy, calcium can be removed from the bones. It includes: Total Iron, Calcium, and Phosphorus.

Urinalysis: Over 15 different items, this panel is useful in the evaluation of conditions such as urinary tract infection, dehydration, and kidney stones.

Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA): The prostate specific antigen (PSA), is a protein made only in the prostate gland. PSA is produced by normal, abnormal and cancerous prostatic tissue. The PSA blood test is an accurate measure of this amount. The theory is that cancer causes more of the protein to be made and leaked into the blood than normal prostate tissue, so PSA is now used for assisting in the diagnosis and monitoring of prostatic carcinoma.

CRP, hs: CRP, hs is a critical component of the immune system and can be predictive of future risk of heart attack, stroke, sudden cardiac death, and the development of peripheral arterial disease. Individuals with elevated levels of CRP have a risk about 2 to 3 times higher than the risk of those with low levels.


Women's Health Check

Only $119

 
DLS Regular Price: $188

Fasting Required: Yes

Specimen: Blood

Results: 3-5 Business Days

Includes: Comprehensive Wellness Profile (CWP), Urinalysis, Estradiol and C-Reactive Protein, hs (CRP, hs)

Comprehensive Wellness Profile (CWP) is the #1 ordered test - year after year! Over 50 individual laboratory tests screen for cardiovascular risk, major organ function, anemia, diabetes, infection, blood disease and other indications of illness. This panel is routinely ordered as a part of an annual exam. It includes: 
Lipids: This is a group of simple blood tests that reveal important information about the types, amount and distribution of the various types of fats (lipids) in the bloodstream. Includes Total Cholesterol, HDL (good) Cholesterol, LDL (bad) Cholesterol, Risk Ratio (good to total), and Triglycerides.
Complete Blood Count(CBC's): It is a blood test that checks hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Used as a broad screening test to check for such disorders as anemia, infection, and many other diseases. Changing levels of red or white blood cells can indicate disease or infection and are very helpful in a health screening.
Fluids and Electrolytes: Electrolytes are minerals in your body that have an electric charge. They are in your blood, urine and body fluids. Maintaining the right balance of electrolytes helps your body's blood chemistry, muscle action and other processes. Sodium, potassium, chlorine, and carbon dioxide are all electrolytes. You get them from the foods you eat and the fluids you drink. Levels of electrolytes in your body can become too low or too high. That can happen when the amount of water in your body changes, causing dehydration or overhydration. Causes include some medicines, vomiting, diarrhea, sweating or kidney problems. Problems most often occur with levels of sodium, potassium or calcium. It includes: Chloride, Potassium, Sodium and Carbon Dioxide.
TSH: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced in the pituitary gland and stimulates the production of thyroid hormones. The TSH helps identify an underactive or overactive thyroid state.
Liver: The liver panel includes several blood tests measuring specific proteins and liver enzymes in the blood. This combination of blood tests is designed to give you a complete picture of the state of your liver and help detect liver disease and measure potential liver damage. Some of the blood tests are associated with the integrity of the liver cells (i.e. ALT), some with liver function (i.e. albumin) and some with disease linked to the biliary system (i.e. alkaline phosphatase). Includes: Albumin, Alkaline Phosphatase, Alanine Transaminase (ALT or SGPT), Aspartate Transaminase (AST or SGOT), Total Bilirubin, Total Protein, LDH, Total Globulin, Albumin/Globulin Ration and GGT.
Kidney: This basic metabolic panel is a group of blood tests that provides information about your body’s metabolism. This test is done to evaluate kidney function, blood acid/base balance, blood sugar levels. It includes Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN), Creatinine, BUN/Creatinine Ratio, eGFR, and Uric Acid.
Glucose Changes in blood glucose are a good indicator of metabolic function and can help detect diseases like diabetes mellitus. Since diabetes is the most common cause of kidney disease in adults, it is important to monitor for this disorder when evaluating kidney function.
Mineral and Bone: In addition to its mechanical functions, the bone is a reservoir for minerals (a "metabolic" function). The bone stores 99% of the body's calcium and 85% of the phosphorus. It is very important to keep the blood level of calcium within a narrow range. If blood calcium gets too high or too low, the muscles and nerves will not function. In times of need, for example, during pregnancy, calcium can be removed from the bones. It includes: Total Iron, Calcium, and Phosphorus.

Urinalysis: Over 15 different items, this panel is useful in the evaluation of conditions such as urinary tract infection, dehydration, and kidney stones.

Estradiol: Also known as E2, is the most active of the estrogens. For women, it is important to look at the relationship between estradiol and progesterone in evaluating menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, mood disorders, and aging skin.

CRP, hs: CRP, hs is a critical component of the immune system and can be predictive of future risk of heart attack, stroke, sudden cardiac death, and the development of peripheral arterial disease. Individuals with elevated levels of CRP have a risk about 2 to 3 times higher than the risk of those with low levels.